Oracle CIoud Infrastructure Load Balancing Connectivity with Ravello O R A C L E W H I T E P A P E R M A R C H

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1 Oracle CIoud Infrastructure Load Balancing Connectivity with Ravello O R A C L E W H I T E P A P E R M A R C H

2 Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Ravello Cloud Service Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Ravello Cloud Service is an overlay cloud that enables enterprises to run their VMware and KVM applications, including complex Layer 2 networking, on a public cloud without making any modifications. With Ravello, enterprises do not need to modify their VMs or change networking. This empowers businesses to rapidly deploy existing data-center applications to the public cloud without any associated infrastructure costs, migration costs, and overhead for a variety of usecases such as production, dev-test, staging, UAT, etc. In this whitepaper, we will show you how to connect Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) Load Balancer to VMware VMs running on OCI Ravello. We will cover the necessary steps to show how to configure the Load Balancer to handle both HTTP and HTTPs traffic. Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Load Balancing The Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Load Balancing service provides automated traffic distribution from one entry point to multiple servers reachable from your virtual cloud network (VCN). The service offers a load balancer with your choice of a public or private IP address, and provisioned bandwidth. More documentation on OCI LBaaS can be found here. Ravello Application For our Ravello environment, we have created a simple application consisting of two webservers which can handle both, HTTP and HTTPS traffic. 1 OCI LOAD BALANCING CONNECTIVITY WITH RAVELLO

3 Fig. 1: Ravello application For both the VMs, we enable port 80 and port 443 which the VMs listens on for new connections. Once Apache is configured with HTTP and HTTPs, we can now test by querying the DNS name or IP address assigned to the Ravello VM. Both and should work. The webservers use a self-signed certificate to enable SSL communication with clients on port 443. To establish connectivity between the Ravello application and the OCI Load Balancer, we will setup a VCN peering between them. VCN peering enables internal connectivity between OCI-native instances and a Ravello application. To read more on how to set up VCN peering for the Ravello application with OCI-native instances, refer to this whitepaper. Configuring OCI Load Balancing We will assume you have created a Public Load Balancer instance on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure. You can follow the steps here to create a Load Balancing instance in your OCI tenancy. We can see the public IP address assigned to this load balancer. 2 OCI LOAD BALANCING CONNECTIVITY WITH RAVELLO

4 Fig. 2: OCI Load Balancer The next steps show how to setup connectivity with our Ravello application. 1) Creating backend sets We will create two backend sets one for HTTP and the other for HTTPS. We will use the webserver public IPs available in the Ravello UI for the OCI Load Balancer to forward traffic to. Fig. 3: HTTP Backend Set 3 OCI LOAD BALANCING CONNECTIVITY WITH RAVELLO

5 Fig. 4: HTTPS Backend Set We then add Backend servers to each of the backend set and populate the internal IP addresses of the webservers from the peered subnet in the Ravello application into the OCI Load Balancer. 4 OCI LOAD BALANCING CONNECTIVITY WITH RAVELLO

6 Fig. 5: Backend servers 2) Add certificate For handling HTTPS, we will configure the OCI Load Balancer to handle end-to-end SSL traffic from the client to the web server the load balancer connects to. Self-signed certificates were created for this purpose, and the CA certificate from the server assigning the certificate was also added in the CA Certificate box. 5 OCI LOAD BALANCING CONNECTIVITY WITH RAVELLO

7 Fig. 6: Add a certificate 3) Create Listeners for HTTP/HTTPS We will now create two listeners: one for handling HTTP requests on port 80 of the Load Balancer and one for handling HTTPS requests on port 443 of the Load Balancer. Each of the listeners will connect to the respective Backend set. Fig 7: Adding HTTP Listener 6 OCI LOAD BALANCING CONNECTIVITY WITH RAVELLO

8 Fig. 8: Adding HTTPS Listener We are now ready to query the Load Balancer on both the HTTP and HTTPS ports to make sure we are routed to the webservers running on Ravello. Fig. 9: Querying the Load Balancer Summary Following the above steps, we can see how an OCI Load Balancing instance can be connected to a Ravello application. Learn how to leverage this to create Highly Available applications on OCI Ravello by reading this whitepaper. 7 OCI LOAD BALANCING CONNECTIVITY WITH RAVELLO

9 Learn more Learn more and sign up for a free trial at Figure 8: Sign up for a free trial. 8 OCI LOAD BALANCING CONNECTIVITY WITH RAVELLO

10 Oracle Corporation, World Headquarters Worldwide Inquiries 500 Oracle Parkway Phone: Redwood Shores, CA 94065, USA Fax: C O N N E C T W I T H U S blogs.oracle.com/oracle facebook.com/oracle twitter.com/oracle oracle.com Copyright 2018, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is provided for information purposes only, and the contents hereof are subject to change without notice. This document is not warranted to be error-free, nor subject to any other warranties or conditions, whether expressed orally or implied in law, including implied warranties and conditions of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. We specifically disclaim any liability with respect to this document, and no contractual obligations are formed either directly or indirectly by this document. This document may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, for any purpose, without our prior written permission. Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners. Intel and Intel Xeon are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation. All SPARC trademarks are used under license and are trademarks or registered trademarks of SPARC International, Inc. AMD, Opteron, the AMD logo, and the AMD Opteron logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices. UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group OCI Load Balancing Connectivity with Ravello March 2018